Favorite Things

Industry folks dish about their prized possessions.

0
23
Sketch-style illustration of kitchen utensils like spoons, knives, forks, tongs, whisks, pie servers and rolling pins on white background.

“I couldn’t live without my cooking spoons. I have tons and I think I might have a problem based on the collection.” —Brother Luck, Lucky Dumpling and Four by Brother Luck, Colorado Springs


“My trusty microplane is a truly slept-on kitchen tool. I use it a lot in my three finishing ‘S’s—salty, sour, spicy—for dishes. These are elements that I am obsessed with and build in layers into most of my cooking.” —Jensen Cummings, Best Served podcast, Denver


“We love our ice cream cart! It was a somewhat whimsical purchase which led us to where we are now. We may not ride it around as much anymore, but we still bring it to the farmers’ market and all of our events. More importantly, it tells our story.“ —Oliver Bacharach, Afternoon Deelites, Aspen


“My favorite thing is a journal notebook (usually Leeds, and usually 7×5 inches) with a pocket. When I’m in research mode, meaning I’m eating food to inform some freelance or book writing, I take notes on everything. I describe the meal, tasting notes, reflections on the restaurant, and if I’m lucky, interviews of people connected to the restaurant. I stuff menus and business cards into the pocket for later reference.” —Adrian Miller, James Beard Award-winning author of Soul Food, The President’s Kitchen Cabinet, and Black Smoke, Denver


“A utility boxcutter by a Japanese company called Olfa. It’s the size of a Sharpie and fits in my apron’s small chest pocket. It’s incredibly useful because we’re constantly opening sealed boxes, bags, containers, and shrink-wrapped cans or bottle tops.” —Chris Lin, Q House, Denver


“I would have to say my hot-pink wine key. It’s versatile in many situations and it’s great to have something ready if I ever have to step behind the stick. And with it being hot pink, it’s easily distinguishable amongst the sea of other wine keys at El Moro and no one wants to steal it.” —Dave Woodruff, El Moro Spirits and Tavern, Durango


“There is no way I could live without our plastic shot glass measuring cup when making ice cream. I have tried all sorts of other measuring devices, but the one- and two-ounce plastic shot glasses are the best!” —Scott Spears, School House Kitchen & Libations, Scrumptious, and So Radish, Arvada

Talk to us! Email your experiences (and thoughts, opinions, and questions—anything, really) to askus@diningout.com


LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here